Scale Conscious

Angela Wallace

Welcome to Scale Conscious, a journey for fearless founders building brave brands for a better world. I'm Ange - a trained conscious capitalist and a brand champion for nearly a decade. We know leaders are under more pressure than ever to figure out how to prosper with purpose. So, what are some strategies for startups to create conscious companies with compassion, conviction and courage? I’m inviting some of the most visionary folks I know to help me answer that question in my first podcast series. Together, we’ll explore how we can use business to create the future we need, now. read less
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Episodios

Why Your Business Needs Stakeholder Management with Nathan Havey, Dr. Rhoda Deon, and Scott Peeples
22-09-2023
Why Your Business Needs Stakeholder Management with Nathan Havey, Dr. Rhoda Deon, and Scott Peeples
About our Guests Nathan Havey is the co-founder of Stakeholder Business and the Thrive Consulting Group. He is also the writer and filmmaker of Beyond Zero, a film that helps business leaders visualize a business beyond profits and help solve humanity’s most pressing problems. You can connect with Nathan on LinkedIn and Twitter. Dr. Rhoda Deon is a spiritual life coach, musician, and learning consultant with a Ph.D. in educational mathematics. She is passionate about creating solutions that maximize efficiency and minimizes frustration. She is currently a freelancer and has worked on curriculum development and supporting small businesses. You can connect with her on LinkedIn and by email at rhoda@rhodadeon.com.   Scott Peeples co-founded Citizen's Farmer, Kindred Lane, Peerfit, and the Contribution Community. He is passionate about supporting healthy growth among emerging social entrepreneurs. Connect with Scott on LinkedIn and Twitter.  Resources 10 Things You Should Know About Stakeholder Capitalism  Beyond Zero  Kiss the Ground Stakeholder Business Episode Highlights Changing How We Think Changing the world for good doesn’t have to be rooted in a scarcity mindset.  For example, regenerative farming's principles of reducing pesticides and herbicides cultivate the soil and improve the local ecosystem.  Changing businesses isn't just about the system; it's also about the people. In the episode, Rhoda shares how she uses a card game to engage people about stakeholder management and capitalism without the discomfort of political discussion. What To Do Today You can take a self-assessment of your stakeholder score on the website.  Remember that things are moving. The movement needs more people and businesses to support change.  The most important is starting. Don’t think about making big changes immediately.  [28:59] Rhoda: “You don't have to make big changes in order to see big results…when we think about conscious business, conscious capitalism, stakeholder theory, stakeholder business, it can seem overwhelming and daunting to get started. But what's most important is getting started, because every small step that we take is incremental change towards [something] larger.”
Breaking Down the Barriers for Every Businesswoman with Nancy Wilson
15-09-2023
Breaking Down the Barriers for Every Businesswoman with Nancy Wilson
Nancy Wilson is an accountant and the Founder and CEO of the Canadian Women's Chamber of Commerce. She is also a Chartered Professional Accountant with experience in various corporate accounting roles. Nancy also started her own accounting and advisory firm, where she worked closely with women business owners and entrepreneurs. As an accountant and business owner, Nancy experienced the barriers and challenges women face in business. She founded the Chamber in 2018 to create a powerful network of women advocating for change and equality in Canada.  Found out more about Nancy and her advocacy work with the Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce on their website. Add your voice of support when you join their community. Resources Visit the Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce and become one of their members advocating for women business owners and entrepreneurs. Knix, a business founded by Joanna Griffiths Better for the Businesswoman is Better for Everyone Data shows that women-owned and led businesses are good investments. Their growth, directly and indirectly, contributes to economic growth. Many women-owned businesses contract work out to freelancers. The self-employed contribute to the output of businesses, while businesses support their growth. There are more than 200,000 women-owned businesses today. Before the pandemic, there were a million. Self-employed Canadians are a group that policy work tends to miss. If they choose to join the unemployed, this can pose a huge problem. The demand for systemic change should be motivated by moral and social justice views. The Power of Collective Action Nancy believes that change at the systemic level can happen through collective action and coordinated advocacy. Individual change is a distraction. It distracts people from systemic barriers and issues, discouraging them from forming groups. Groups like the Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce speak to the policymakers. However, they need women’s voices to inform them of their experiences and thoughts. Advocacy means more than just signing petitions and marching in rallies.  You can also advocate through the way you run your business, your conversations with people, and joining groups like the Chamber. Enjoyed this Episode? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, leave us a review. You can also share this with your friends and family. This episode helps raise awareness and advocate for change for a better system for every businesswoman in their industries. Have any questions? You can connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Thanks for tuning in! For more updates, visit our website. You can also listen to more amazing episodes on Spotify or Apple Podcasts
Leadership Values for a Better Tomorrow with Tabatha Bull
08-09-2023
Leadership Values for a Better Tomorrow with Tabatha Bull
Tabatha Bull is the president and CEO of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business. She is committed to supporting the indigenous economy with her team at CCAB. By removing systemic barriers and advocating for diversity, Tabatha aims to improve opportunities for indigenous businesses.  Tabatha is Anishinaabe, a proud member of the Nipissing First Nation. She is also an electrical engineer committed to supporting indigenous communities, especially in the energy sector. Tabatha wants to realize the potential for growth in the indigenous community and strengthen the path toward reconciliation. Listen to this episode to: 1. Discover the difficulties indigenous peoples face. 2. Find out the critical leadership values we need to address today’s injustices. 3. Learn the seven grandfather teachings and how to take them into your business. Resources: Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business Shopper’s Drug Mart Jenn Harper and Cheekbone Beauty  Connect with Tabatha: LinkedIn | CCAB Connect with Angela: Angela Wallace Impact Agency | Scale Conscious Episode Highlights Tabatha: “We all have an opportunity, not just a role to play, but an opportunity to really make a difference.” Procurement is one of CCAB’s programs that has become a major priority.  Indigenous businesses are in various sectors. Other companies can support the economy by purchasing what they need from them. It’s especially important for small and medium businesses to do so. This can allow indigenous businesses to get in and get the experience they need to grow. One of the biggest barriers is their access to financial and social capital. Many of their businesses need connections that can help them grow, scale, or even start. Before coming to CCAB, Tabatha worked in the energy sector. At that time, she reflected on the seven grandfather's teachings and felt that her work went against her values. For her, much is rooted in honesty. Tabatha tried to come from a place of honesty to build trust and humility. CCAB now has a circular organizational chart. Their mission is at the circle's center, followed by the CEO's office. Each department has an equal slice of pie in the circle. A hierarchical chart only connects at the top level. Meanwhile, a circular structure ensures that everyone is connected and equally important. Tabatha: “We have to remember that we're only as strong as the people that are working with us. And if they're feeling overwhelmed, then we need to find ways to support them.” Sometimes, you may feel disheartened and feel there's not enough movement. It takes a lot of patience, but much progress has been made in the past years. Throughout their struggles, indigenous businesses continue to show up and show their resiliency. There are many opportunities, and several people support the work the CCAB is doing. There are more and more conversations about indigenous businesses and the opportunities and benefits of working with them. People need to spread the word and keep these conversations going. Remember to be gentle with yourself and with each other on the journey. Let your leadership values reflect that. Everybody has their own pace. Find the route that can be easier for your heart and mind.
The Future Doesn’t Need Business As Usual, with Halla Tómasdóttir
01-09-2023
The Future Doesn’t Need Business As Usual, with Halla Tómasdóttir
Halla Tómasdóttir is an Islamic business leader, former politician, public speaker, and thought leader. She is also the CEO of B Team, a collective of global business and civil society leaders working to catalyze better business practices for the well-being of people worldwide  Halla was on the founding team and the first female CEO of Reykjavik University. She also co-founded and led an ESG-focused investment firm. In 2016, Halla announced her candidacy for the presidency of Iceland and won the second-highest share of the vote.  Episode Description: How can we become a leader in a more sustainable and inclusive world? In this episode, Halla Tómasdóttir inspires aspiring entrepreneurs to become conscious leaders who aspire to a radically collaborative, inclusive, and transparent business. She shares insightful lessons on how to harness your inside-out power and stay true to your moral compass.  Business as usual won't fix today's crises. If you aim to create a better world, this episode is for you! Be inspired by Halla's leadership journey from her corporate roots to becoming the first female CEO of a university to now leading The B Team. Discover how leader conformity and doing business as usual endangers our future. Learn to harness your inside-out power and your inner compass to become a leader for a sustainable and inclusive world. Resources: The B Team  The New Leadership Playbook by The B Team Connect with Halla Tómasdóttir: Website | LinkedIn | Facebook  Connect with Angela Wallace: Website | LinkedIn | | Twitter | Instagram Listen to more Scale Conscious episodes here.  Episode Highlights: Halla: “Mother Nature will probably survive our abuse. [The] question is, “Do we want to be here?’ and ‘Do we want our children and grandchildren to be here and have the quality of life or the quality of opportunities that we've had?’” People have to be willing to change the way they lead, look at things, and shift norms in the system, like bringing more women, people of color, and next-generation people.  Halla also points out the importance of building bridges between those in power and those with new ideas and mindsets. Inside-out power is the power to stay the course despite disruptions. Halla: “I don't know a single human being — formal leadership or informal leadership or my own kids who are 19 and 21 — who don't want to be around to be in service of a better future. I think everyone ultimately wants that.” People need to believe in the future and have connections to have meaningful lives. Halla encourages people to look to the internal world to regenerate and build resilience.  A person can only be a successful entrepreneur, leader, or human if they do the inner work as hard as the outer work. Believe that you can create a future where you love where you live and work.  You created your reality; your choices brought you here.  No one can do everything, but everyone has a role to play. Have clarity on your inner moral compass — that is your GPS to the future you love. It is about dropping from your head to your heart and becoming clear about your purpose.  Halla: “No one person, no one company, no one stakeholder can meet this moment. But if we unlock the full system and service of the future we want, and all the money that's in it, if we get the human science, I think this future might arrive faster than any one of us could imagine today.” Be clear on your why and who you choose to be.  Be authentic. No one can be a leader unless they can truly be themselves.  Strive for gender balance. It’s not just about one’s sex but about gender ideas. Gender balance is capitalism with care. Be purpose-driven. It's not enough to have a meaningful purpose if you're not going to be principled about approaching it. Have any questions? You can email me at hello@scaleconscious.com or connect with me on  LinkedIn, Twitter, or Instagram.
Better Future: No Role is Too Small in Sustainability Efforts, With Solitaire Townsend
24-08-2022
Better Future: No Role is Too Small in Sustainability Efforts, With Solitaire Townsend
Solitaire Townsend is the Co-Founder and Chief Solutionist at Futerra, a change agency. The team focuses on making “the Anthropocene awesome.” Through campaigns, training, and strategy, Futerra helps companies get closer to their sustainable goals. The agency operates under the ethos of “logic and magic,” merging elements like data and creativity to work towards a more sustainable, just, and regenerative future. In today’s episode, Soli Townsend joins us to discuss why we should dream big and set goals that are “bonkers” when it comes to sustainability. We also chat about the importance of everyday people in the sustainability movement, and why even so-called small actions make a big difference. Plug into this episode if… You have been doom-scrolling and want some positive thinking tied to sustainability.You want to play a part in the climate movement but aren’t sure where you fit in.You want to understand how long-term and short-term goals factor into efforts for sustainability, for both companies and individuals. Resources Futerra“The Happy Hero: How to Change Your Life by Changing the World”The Awesome Anthropocene GoalsHip Hop Caucus“The Intersectional Environmentalist: How to Dismantle Systems of Oppression to Protect People + Planet” by Leah ThomasEveryday Climate Heroes Episode highlights Why imagining a better world is a difficult necessity Coverage about the climate crisis is so dire that it can often be difficult to imagine a better future — but doing so is necessary if we ever want to enact change.Sometimes you have to set goals that are completely “bonkers” in order to get to a more sustainable and equitable world.There’s no downside to imagining a better world — it’s all about dreaming big, then backing those dreams up with challenging stretch goals that set you into action. Everyday people can make a difference You don’t have to be a celebrity or well-known activist to take steps towards a more sustainable life and world. You just need to constantly ask yourself, of every decision you make: “Is this decision serving the solutions or serving destruction?”If people can’t envision themselves as activists or changemakers in their own communities, they won’t take actions to make a difference — and we need everyone on board. This is why everyday representation in the climate movement is so important.There are no small roles in the larger movement towards sustainability and equity. How any company can set itself up for positive change It can seem like taking action on sustainability requires book-long guides and huge commitments. All it actually requires is making the right choice decision after decision after decision.Solitaire recommends setting radical goals for 2030 — seven years away — and then setting hard targets in a 6- to 18-month cycle that help you get there.It’s important for businesses to set goals that they don’t yet know how to achieve, since the rest of the world is doing the same. Trust that new solutions will emerge as you work towards your “bonkers” goals, and that if they don’t, you’ll find new ways to achieve them.
Scale Conscious: Rhiannon Rosalind on Deep Listening and Intergenerational Connections
10-08-2022
Scale Conscious: Rhiannon Rosalind on Deep Listening and Intergenerational Connections
Rhiannon Rosalind is the Chief Visionary Officer and Co-Founder of The Global Institute for Conscious Economics, a not-for-profit organization that strives to create systemic change within the new economy. The organization leads projects like HeARTwork, a campaign to look at the needs of women and non-binary employees in corporate companies who feel ignored or unheard. Using the tools of storytelling and music, HeARTwork focuses on how to gather real information through deep listening and a desire for understanding rather than cold data. In today’s episode, Rhiannon Rosalind joins us to discuss the challenges of starting her own venture, why deep listening is a huge benefit to leaders, and what it means to engage a truly diverse group of people looking towards a more equitable future. Plug into this episode if… You want to learn about resilience in the face of business challenges — both internal and external.You want to find out about alternative approaches to co-creating the new economy.You want to be challenged to re-think the ways in which you approach conversations about the topics you’re passionate about, especially on an intergenerational level. Resources The Global Institute for Conscious EconomicsHeARTworkThe Indigenomics Institute Economic Club of Canada Episode highlights Why deep listening is so impactful When you simply look at the data without actually listening to people’s personal stories, you only get half the story. Deep listening requires digging deeper and getting to the root of issues.If teams don’t employ deep listening, they work in siloes — and solutions created in siloes never work for everyone.To encourage deep listening, you also have to communicate in a way that’s easier to hear. HeARTwork shares women’s stories not in a traditional whitepaper, but using a more creative, storytelling approach. This lets employees share what they might normally be afraid to talk about in the workplace, and it makes it easier for others to actually listen to that message. Co-creating is essential for lasting change Change that is real — and lasting — comes from hearing everyone’s concerns and working together to co-create a new reality.So many of us want to create change on a deep, meaningful level, but we’re not willing to get out of our echo chambers. True co-creation requires understanding diverse perspectives, with diverse voices from different genders, races, backgrounds, and ages.There are many groups that aren’t being invited to the table that should absolutely be there. The importance of doing work you’re passionate about Pushing people to make change is important, but it can be exhausting. Sometimes it can be just as powerful to attract the right people to a movement.As an entrepreneur, resilience isn’t about not being afraid. It’s about moving forward despite the fear.When building a meaningful career, it’s important to follow your own intuition and desires. Everyone else will have ideas about what you should and shouldn’t do, but you’re the only person who knows what lights you up. “Solutions have to be based on hearing the truth first.” - Rhiannon Rosalind
Better Bosses: The Pandemic as Impetus for Re-Thinking Management with Johnathan & Melissa
27-07-2022
Better Bosses: The Pandemic as Impetus for Re-Thinking Management with Johnathan & Melissa
Johnathan and Melissa Nightingale are the co-founders of Raw Signal Group, a B Corp-certified, Toronto-based business dedicated to helping businesses improve their leadership. Their experience in the tech industry inspired them to help founders sharpen and improve their management skills. Among their many guiding principles, Johnathan and Melissa believe that “the measure of a leader is the excellence of their team.” So, how do you keep talent invested, engaged and fulfilled? What flaws in your current management style are holding your team back? Johnathan and Melissa answer questions like these, and many more, through their work. In today’s episode, Johnathan and Melissa join us to discuss why leadership isn’t something you are born with, and how being honest about your work environment is important. They also tell us more about how the shift to remote work has only made management skills even more important. And they walk us through why they approach their work with a refreshing, curse-word-filled attitude. Plug into this episode if… You want to learn more about the difference between a stereotypical leader and a team-oriented manager.You want to hear honest thoughts on how management styles need to improve.You want to get insights into how workplaces can make changes inspired by the shift to remote work. Resources: Raw Signal Group Newsletter Episode highlights Remote work has changed things Companies have felt a more urgent need to re-assess their workplace structure and culture during the pandemic.For managers who were already making strides and keeping employees’ needs in mind, the remote shift opened up doors to finding new talent. But for management that had flaws, it was an especially challenging time.While some companies are saying the issue is on the talent side, the problem might be with management and the workplace. Leaders aren’t born Many higher-level positions came from promotions, which often don’t include training on how to manage teams. Leaders aren’t born with these skills.Becoming a good leader doesn’t have to be complicated — it’s more about learning the right ways to make day-to-day actions, like one-on-ones and team meetings, more effective.If leaders want to improve their management style long-term, they can start soaking in guidance from podcasts, books, newsletters, and more. Employer branding requires being genuine As the “Great Resignation” takes place, companies can feel like they need to be incredibly impactful and purposeful in order to attract and retain employees.However, not every company needs to be curing cancer or saving the world. Employees are happy to belong to an encouraging team, earn a fair paycheque, and have work-life balance.Becoming a great employer or leader isn’t about sugarcoating work or marketing yourself inauthentically. It’s about bringing your strengths to the surface and working with those. “We said, ‘Look, if the problem is that bosses have not been given any of the foundational skills or tools, and that is resulting in toxic workplaces because they are under-equipped, we can equip them. If the fundamental challenge here is that these are businesses that either should not exist in the world or leaders who should not lead in the world, then that's a different problem.’” - Melissa Ready for more? Scale Conscious is a podcast that explores the tactics startups can take to create conscious companies and build a regenerative future for all. Join host Ange Wallace as she explores building purpose-driven businesses and scaling consciously with some of today’s bravest and most impactful leaders.
Better Community: Supporting the Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow with Karen Greve Young of Futurpreneur
13-07-2022
Better Community: Supporting the Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow with Karen Greve Young of Futurpreneur
Karen Greve Young is the CEO of Futurpreneur, a nonprofit in Canada that’s been fueling the entrepreneurial passions of Canada’s young enterprises for two decades. Futurpreneur is the only nonprofit that provides financing, mentoring, and support tools to aspiring business owners from the ages of 18 to 39. Since its inception 25 years ago, Futurpreneur has helped 12,000 businesses launch across every province and territory, 43% of which identify as women-led, and provided $169 million in capital alongside one-on-one mentorship. In this episode, Karen Greve Young joins us to discuss why she’s so passionate about building support for entrepreneurs and how the pandemic has affected—and empowered—many young entrepreneurs across the country. We dive into the impact Futurpreneur has had in Canada, what recovery has looked like for entrepreneurs in a global pandemic, and how these programs create more equity and support for young and diverse entrepreneurs. Plug into this episode if… You’re a budding entrepreneur looking for a support network or guidance in getting started, figuring out what your goals are, and executing on them.You’re curious about how the pandemic impacted the field of entrepreneurship, and how entrepreneurs today are moving forward.You want to learn to champion entrepreneurs in marginalised communities and those with impact goals. Resources Futurpreneur Episode highlights How an entrepreneurial community can support young entrepreneurs through certain and uncertain times Futurpreneur works with entrepreneurs right at the beginning of their entrepreneurship journey. As a result, their entrepreneurs are incredibly diverse and have different goals. They come from coast to coast, tiny villages to large cities, and represent all different sectors. This diversity helps strengthen the knowledge and resilience within an entrepreneurial community.Entrepreneurial support comes in many different forms. It can include mentorship, financial support, knowledge, or even just a place to brainstorm, strategize, or commiserate among fellow entrepreneurs. Creating equal opportunity for Black and Indigenous entrepreneurs If you want to truly help entrepreneurs from marginalised communities, you need to have employees and leadership that have lived experiences relevant to those communities. Diversity at all levels, including your board and leadership, is vital.Part of creating equal opportunity is realising that certain communities don’t have the same access or privilege that others do around information, resources, and education. Realise what those hurdles are and help others overcome them by bringing the information they need to them.Futurpreneur helps Black and Indigenous entrepreneurs not only start a business, but succeed with their business. They recognize that every entrepreneur faces different barriers, and helping entrepreneurs succeed means helping tactically dismantle those barriers. How entrepreneurs can balance people, planet, and profit If you’re an entrepreneur, ask yourself: What is your why? What are you planning on making, and what will you do if your company is wildly successful? One of your bottom lines is, by necessity, profit — but think about what else you can do for your community and your planet.Accountability requires measurement. If you’re looking to be sustainable or inclusive, how are you doing that, and how are you measuring it? Measuring your efforts for people and the planet will help you set milestones and continue to iterate.
Better Culture: How to Make Work Work for Everyone with Avery Francis of Bloom
29-06-2022
Better Culture: How to Make Work Work for Everyone with Avery Francis of Bloom
Avery Francis is the founder and CEO of Bloom, a full-service workplace design consultancy. Bloom helps companies of all sizes grow their teams, scale their HR practices, and develop fantastic employee experiences in a way that’s impactful, equitable, and engaging. They also recently launched Bloom Academy, a digital program for immersive diversity, equity, and learning experiences. In today’s episode, Avery Francis joins us to discuss why she started Bloom and why companies today are experiencing high turnover rates and mass resignations. We dive into how companies and teammates can start doing the work to build conscious, people-first companies, and Avery shares three radical approaches she’s adopted when building out her own team at Bloom. Plug into this episode if: You want to understand how to increase employee engagement and retention at your organization.You want to commit to DEI and doing the work, but you’re feeling nervous about it.You want to peek behind the scenes and understand how a people-first workplace design consultancy treats its own team members. Resources: BloomBloom Academy Episode highlights Why companies need to go further with DEI Workplaces and work systems weren’t built with everyone in mind — which is why simply saying you’re committed to DEI isn’t enough. Systemic change is necessary.Many workshops and trainings simply provide learners with a new perspective, but they don’t bridge the gap to teach learners how to do things differently in an actionable way.Real DEI work requires investment — both a financial commitment, but more importantly, time. Employees are hungry for change The pandemic, together with social and political movements, have changed what individuals are looking for out of work.The Great Resignation can be thought about as The Great Realization — employees are becoming aware of what’s more important to them.If companies want to increase retention and employee engagement, they need to actually listen to what employees want and build their work structures around it. Quick fixes don’t exist. How Avery builds a people-first culture at Bloom Bloom’s staff adopted a four-day workweek four years ago at Bloom. However, there are certain considerations companies need to keep in mind when adopting a four-day workweek.Bloom’s period or menstruation budget serves as both a support to employees and an opportunity to educate.Avery doesn’t default to traditional employment structures. Instead, employees are paired with a financial advisor on their very first day and they get to decide for themselves whether they would like to work as full-time employees, sole proprietors, or corporations. This affords them freedom, flexibility, and financial independence. Powerful quotes from the episode: “We’ve been doing the four-day workweek for four years. As a service-based organization, this has always been something that's been perceived as a bit of a radical approach, because ultimately, there's one day a week when we aren't that available to clients. And that means that we have to hold some pretty strong boundaries, and it means that we can do less work and work with less companies and make less money. But as an organization that puts people over profits. I'm okay with that.”