AP Taylor Swift

aptaylorswift

Welcome to AP Taylor Swift, the podcast for Swifties with English degrees (or those who just overanalyze everything). Each episode, we dive into a deep-reading of Taylor Swift’s lyrics to uncover the literary themes, references, and inspirations behind the songs to better understand and interpret why Taylor Swift’s songs resonate so deeply with fans. Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe Follow us on social! TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwift Instagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwift YouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwift Link Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswift Bookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts read less
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Episodios

E24: Deep Dive - right where you left me
Hace 4 días
E24: Deep Dive - right where you left me
Did you ever hear about the girl who got frozen? In this week’s deep dive episode, we discuss the evermore bonus track, “right where you left me.” We explore themes of feeling stuck, the haunting presence of the narrator, the plea for help, and how we see attitudes in the song mirrored in society. This beautiful and ultimately sad song also inspired a wide range of references from Elle Woods to Charles Dickens to Foucault. This song definitely has some layers, so join us as we unpack their meaning and ultimately try to get to the purpose of “right where you left me.”    Mentioned in this episode:  Arrested Development Ghost (the movie)  School Spirit (show on Netflix) "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens  The Man Who Can’t Be Moved (song) "The Notebook" by Nicholas Sparks "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde  "The Age of Adelaide" (film)  "The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue"  "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling Legally Blonde  The Last Five Years "No Exit" by Jean-Paul Sartre "1984" by George Orwell "Discipline and Punish" by Foucault  "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury  Jeremy Bentham’s body  Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI *** Episode Highlights:  [0:35] - Introduction to “right where you left me”  [2:45] - Setting the scene of the song  [7:07] - Metaphorically and literally being stuck  [10:00] - The characters in this song  [17:50] - “the glass shattered on the white cloth”  [24:52] - The Panopticon and society’s expectations [36:15] - Taylor’s use of “haunting” as imagery [43:09] - The song as a metaphor for mental health    Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E23: Show and Tell - Mad Women
14-02-2024
E23: Show and Tell - Mad Women
There’s nothing like a mad woman, what a shame she went mad.  What better way to celebrate Valentine’s Day than with some songs about women scorned? In this episode, we bring to you three songs that represent mad women. Maansi kicks off the discussion with the scornful, vengeful mad woman in “Better Than Revenge,” Jodi walks us through the woman who’s driven to insanity in “mad woman,” and Jenn wraps up the discussion with an example of the mad woman who is stuck in bonus track “right where you left me.” We close out the discussion by acknowledging how all of these songs are indicative of a movement that’s giving women everywhere the opportunity to reclaim the “mad woman” stigma. Did we know this episode would drop on Valentine’s Day when we recorded it? No. Are we mad about it? Not at all!   Mentioned in this episode:  Hildegard of Bingen Sigmund Freud Mean Girls “Before He Cheats,” Carrie Underwood “Mama’s Broken Heart,” Miranda Lambert “Jolene,” Dolly Parton “Vigilante shit,” Taylor Swift The Country of the Blind, HG Wells Game of Thrones Great Expectations, Charles Dickens Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte The Female Malady, Elaine Showalter  Villette, Charlotte Bronte Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See Cinderella’s Sisters: A Revisionist History of Foot Binding, Dorothy Ko “Mama’s broken heart,” Miranda Lambert Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI ***   Episode Highlights:  [01:47] Intro to “mad women” & hysteria [09:43] “Better than revenge,” Speak Now [33:52] “mad woman,” folklore [50:52] “right where you left me,” evermore [1:13:02] Reclaiming the mad woman   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E22: Deep Dive - The Outside
07-02-2024
E22: Deep Dive - The Outside
We’ve all been in a lot of lonely places. In this week’s deep dive, your hosts take you back to one of the original sad songs from Taylor’s debut album, “The Outside.” Perhaps more of a deep cut, this song cuts straight to the heart of what it feels like to be left out. Join us to discover what this song meant to us in our high school years vs today. We’ll explore how Taylor’s writing and musical styles may have changed, but she’s always known how to capture some of the most universal experiences, particularly for women! TW: We do discuss eating issues and disorders in this episode. We are fortunately recovered so the ultimate result is body positivity, but FYI!  Mentioned in this episode:  The Outside - the song  Pride & Prejudice  Lizzie McGuire  Untangled by Lisa Damour Queen Bees & Wannabes  Robert Frost The Good Enough Job  Mean Girls  Hamilton   Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   *** Episode Highlights:  [00:56] Introduction to “The Outside”  [02:59] Lizzie McGuire captures the spirit of “The Outside”  [09:11] Taylor references Robert Frost [17:01] “I’ve never been on the outside”  [21:35] Is there a bridge in this song?  [24:09] Feeling on “the outside” when you start a new job  [30:48] The purpose of “The Outside”  Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
Bonus - Taylor Swift's "The Tortured Poets Department" Announcement Analysis
06-02-2024
Bonus - Taylor Swift's "The Tortured Poets Department" Announcement Analysis
And so I enter into evidence…In this very special BONUS episode, your Unofficial Professors of Taylor Swift go deep into the artifacts that Taylor has released for her upcoming album, “The Tortured Poets Department.” From the album art, the title, and the poem, to the track titles, we discuss it all! Is this album going to be more intellectual or emotional? Is Taylor on defense or offense? How wrong will all of our predictions be when the album is actually released? Well, we give you our hypotheses for the first two questions, but we will all have to wait until April 19th to see how well this conversation ages!      Mentioned in this episode:  Euphues by John Lyly (origin of “all’s fair in love and war”) Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf by Edward Albee Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf  The Poetry of Dorothy Parker Mythology by Edith Hamilton Potter Puppet Pals: The Mysterious Ticking Noise Tick, Tick…Boom! by Jonathan Larson, Directed by Lin Manuel Miranda   Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI ***   Episode Highlights:  01:08 - Analyzing the Album Cover 03:07 - The Title: "Chairman of the Tortured Poets Department" 07:12 - The Poem: "And So I Enter Into Evidence" 36:30 - All's Fair in Love and Poetry 45:36 - Tracklist Analysis 54:11 - The Back Cover Image Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E21: Show and Tell - Musicals
31-01-2024
E21: Show and Tell - Musicals
If I was a [rich] man, I’d be the man. Curtain up! Light the lights! Today we are finally devoting an entire episode to one of our favorite topics: MUSICALS. Jenn identifies “The Outside,” from Taylor Swift, as the perfect song for the Phantom in Phantom of the Opera. (Never seen it? No worries, Jenn gives a full synopsis!). Then, Jodi finds parallels between “The Man” and “If I Were a Rich Man,” from Fiddler on the Roof. And finally, we can’t talk about musicals without Hamilton! Maansi brings it home by comparing “Midnight Rain” to “Satisfied,” and we wonder if (and when!) Lin Manuel Miranda and Taylor Swift will bring their lyrical genius minds together.    Mentioned in this episode:  “The Outside,” Taylor Swift, 2007 Phantom of the Opera Movie Phantom of the Opera, Gaston Leroux Book Phantom of the Opera: Live from London  “Musicals that wouldn’t exist if the man had just gone to therapy”  “The Man,” Lover, 2019 Fiddler on the Roof “If I Were a Rich Man,” Chiam Topol, Fiddler on the Roof (1971) “Midnight Rain,” Midnights, 2022 “Satisfied,” Hamilton Hamilton Singin’ in the Rain Mean Girls  Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat   Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   *** Episode Highlights:  [02:01] Curtain up: Introduction to Musicals [06:47] “The Outside” and Phantom of the Opera [23:34] “The Man” and “If I Was a Rich Man,” Fiddler on the Roof [36:50] “Midnight Rain” and “Satisfied,” Hamilton   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E20: Deep Dive - Mastermind
24-01-2024
E20: Deep Dive - Mastermind
None of it was accidental. This week we’re going deep into Midnights favorite “Mastermind.” After looking at this Taylor Swift song from the perspective of satire in our previous episode, we take another look to examine what Taylor is actually “mastermind”-ing. Is it a relationship? Or is it a nod to her many (many) easter eggs she leaves her fans? Maansi explores how Taylor weaves strategic language into the lyrics to reclaim the idea that she’s “calculating.” Jodi finds connections to The Odyssey, Oedipus Rex, and Greek mythology to bring this to an AP-level conversation. And Jenn shares more context about why “all the wisest women had to do it this way,” has deep roots in literature and history. Join us as we unpack this cryptic and potentially Machiavellian song! Mentioned in this episode:  TIME Magazine December 7, 1981 “Crazy Over Cats”  TIME Magazine Person of the Year 2023 Phantom Thread Mythology, Edith Hamilton  The Odyssey, Homer, Emily Wilson translation   Oedipus Rex, Sophocles   Guys and Dolls Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen  Hamilton  Founding Mothers, Cokie Roberts RBG  Jackie The Voices of Neims, Suzannah Lipscomb  Matilda, Roald Dahl   Harry Potter, JK Rowling   Broadway Sings Mean Girls  The Woman in Me, Britney Spears Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn I Care A Lot   Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   ***   Episode Highlights:  [02:23] “And now you’re mine” - WHO? [05:05] Mastermind: Benji’s Vision  [10:00] “The planets, and the fates…” Greek mythology  [16:26] “We were born to the the pawn in every lover’s game” [26:44] “I’ve been scheming like a criminal ever since” The Bridge! [33:40] “I’m only cryptic and Machiavellian cause I care”  [43:31] “Check Mate: I couldn’t lose”  [47:23] What is the purpose of this song? Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig akaScotty Z.
E19: Show and Tell - Satire
17-01-2024
E19: Show and Tell - Satire
I’m dying to see how this one ends. We talk about satire - what it is, how it’s different from parody or hyperbole, how Taylor uses it and why. Jodi starts with the quintessential satirical example from Taylor’s catalog - “Blank Space,” Jenn argues that Reputation is actually a satirical album, and Maansi makes a case for satire in “Mastermind.” Find out what witch hunts and chess have to do with it all. We acknowledge that satire is an intellectual form of comedy, which requires us to examine what Taylor is saying in a more nuanced way. Hear our first read interpretations, and then hunker down for the second read interpretations that unravel the threads of satire a bit to get to the heart of what she’s trying to say. Mentioned in this episode:  "Blank Space" 1989"I did something bad" reputation"Mastermind" MidnightsOxford languages dictionary, SatireThe OnionSNLWeird Al Animal Farm, George OrwellBest in ShowScary MoviesHunger GamesWeekend Update, SNL“A Modest Proposal” Jonathan Swift, 1729AristophenesEnglish Professor Discusses Satire & Performs Rhetorical Analysis on Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”Witches, midwives, and nurses, Barbara EhrenreichThe Prince, MachiavelliThe Art of War, MachiavelliQueen’s Gambit Looking for an audio book? Check out our Libro.fm playlist https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI *** Episode Highlights:  [00:38] What is satire and how is it different from Parody? [04:33] Jonathan Swift satire [07:33] Blank Space [20:28] I did something bad [32:28] Mastermind   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/aptsLibro.fm → https://tidd.ly/47uhRVI This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E18: Deep Dive - Death By a Thousand Cuts
10-01-2024
E18: Deep Dive - Death By a Thousand Cuts
My, my, my, my. We get deep into our feelings on this deep dive today with “Death By a Thousand Cuts,” from Lover. With a title referencing an imperial form of torture, what is this Taylor Swift song really about? As always, our hosts look at the lyrics from very different perspectives based on our own personal experiences, from moving out of a childhood home (“chandelier still flickering here”) to a breakup (“You said it was a great love”) to Spiderman (“I see you everywhere”). We talk about idioms, loss, grief, the emotional burden of pain, and how asking the traffic lights for answers maybe isn’t as far-fetched as some of us originally thought. Will we ever hear this song the same way again? “I don’t know!” Mentioned in this episode:  The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald“Death By a Thousand Cuts,” Lover (2019)“Death By a Thousand Cuts” Tiny Desk ConcertWikipedia definition of “death by a thousand cuts”Tom Holland’s Umbrella Lip Sync BattleFinding Nemo Great Expectations, Charles DickensThe NotebookMoby Dick, Herman Melville Love Again Someone Great Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, Lori Gottlieb    *** Episode Highlights:  [02:15] Defining “death by a thousand cuts” [08:18] My, my, my, my: What is this opening? [15:50] United we stand: The things shared in a relationship  [20:03] Paper thin plans: Connecting this song to “Paper Rings” [22:11] Trying to find a part of me you didn't take up: Why this love is so hard to get over  [28:11] I ask the traffic lights: Looking anywhere for answers [34:00] It's just a thousand cuts: The purpose of the song   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E17: Show and Tell - The Great Gatsby
03-01-2024
E17: Show and Tell - The Great Gatsby
Feeling so Gatsby for that whole year. Taylor Swift loves to make direct and indirect references to the classic American novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. So we decided to dive into those connections and see what all the fuss is about. In this week’s episode, we each picked a song that we wanted to relate to The Great Gatsby. Join us as Maansi brings the party with “This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things,” Jenn explores Gatsby’s motivations with “Death by a Thousand Cuts,” and Jodi brings it all together by digging into the character of Daisy with “happiness.”  Mentioned in this episode:  “This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things” reputation  “Death by a Thousand Cuts” Lover  “happiness” evermore "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald  Taylor’s 2014 Gatsby-Inspired People Magazine cover  "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling “Funny Girl”  Zelda Fitzgerald - The History Chicks Podcast  "Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald," by Therese Anne Fowler "The Edible Woman" by Margaret Atwood  "Romeo & Juliet," by William Shakespeare   ***   Episode Highlights:  [00:30] Introduction to The Great Gatsby  [07:25] “This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things,” reputation [23:21] “Death by a Thousand Cuts,” Lover [34:35] “happiness,” evermore   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
Re-Release: Deep Dive - Enchanted
27-12-2023
Re-Release: Deep Dive - Enchanted
Enchanted to (re)meet you. Revisit one of our favorite early episodes with us! As a holiday treat, we are giving our Deep Dive into “Enchanted” its own time to shine. In our first deep dive episode, we did a deep reading of Taylor Swift’s song “Enchanted” from Speak Now (Taylor’s Version). We’re wonderstruck as we learn how to analyze a text using the rhetorical triangle to better understand who is speaking, who they are speaking to, and the purpose of the text. We find connections to “Pride and Prejudice,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” Barbie, Cinderella, college, and Greek mythology…all in one 5ish minute song. We left no lingering questions to keep us up!    Mentioned in the episode: “Enchanted” by Taylor Swift “Cinderella” Disney Film “Pride and Prejudice,” by Jane Austen  “Singin’ in the Rain”  “Barbie,” 2023 movie   *** Episode Highlights:  [01:30] APTS 101: How to analyze a text [02:54] Who is this speaker forcing laughter, and does she fit in?  [04:21] Why “Enchanted” is “Pride and Prejudice”-coded  [06:28] Exploring word choice to examine the time period [08:44] How the song ruminates on a single moment and feeling [10:48] Who is the song speaking to? A person? The Universe? [16:53] Why “Hey Stephen” and “Enchanted” feel so different [19:02] The words and phrases that create mystique and depth [22:15] “Flawless,” “Forever,” and the power of hyperbole [24:00] Our takeaways from our playful conversation  Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E16: Deep Dive - tis the damn season
20-12-2023
E16: Deep Dive - tis the damn season
Messy as the mud on your truck tires. We couldn’t let a holiday season go by without THE song about THE damn season, could we? Continuing the conversation from our Show and Tell episode on holidays, this week we deep dive “tis the damn season,” from evermore (2020). We start by diving into Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” to get a better understanding of the song. Then our hosts spend a lot of time trying to figure out who the characters are, what their relationship is to one another, and what exactly they’re trying to call “even.” From examining what makes this a small town song, to figuring out why it “always” leads to “you” and “my hometown,” to imagining this song as a movie–we go on a whole deep dive journey on this one, with a lot of film, TV, and music references. Listen to see what “300,” “Groundhog Day,” and “Friends” all have in common with this song! Mentioned in the episode: “tis the damn season,” evermore (2020) “The Road Not Taken,” Robert Frost “Midnight Rain,” Midnights (2022) “Say don’t go,” 1989 (Taylor’s Version), 2023 “You’re On Your Own Kid,” Midnights (2022) “300” (2007) “Phantom of the Opera” (2004) “Before Sunset” (2004) “Before Sunrise” (1995) “Groundhog Day” (1993) “Friends: The One With the Red Sweater” (S8 E2) “Don’t Blame Me,” reputation (2017) “Enchanted,” Speak Now (Taylor’s Version) 2023 E2: Deep Dive - Enchanted  “The Great” (2020) “Everything Everywhere All At Once” (2022)    ***   Episode Highlights:  [01:09] We could call it even: Who are the characters here? [06:25] The road not taken looks real good now: The role of Robert Frost’s poem [08:58] You can call me babe for the weekend: What’s the relationship here? [12:45] Remember how you watched me leave: Why do they only have the weekend together? [19:16] So I’ll Go Back to LA: Choosing big-city life over small town life [22:26] And the heart I know I’m breaking is my own: Y tho? [29:40] To leave the warmest bed I've ever known: Debating the emotions of the song [33:15] And I’ll be yours for the weekend: It’s always the bridge! [39:40] It always leads to you in my hometown: What is the purpose of this song?   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E15: Show and Tell - Holidays
13-12-2023
E15: Show and Tell - Holidays
Soon they’ll have the nerve to deck the halls. On this week’s episode we attempted to lean right into the festivities of the season with a Holidays themed episode. But…did we actually pick holiday songs? We start by defining what the “holiday season” even means in an attempt to answer the question. Jodi discusses “New Year’s Day,” with the thesis that it’s a song about the everyday, not necessarily the holidays. Jenn brings on the holiday melancholy with “champagne problems,” sparking a hot conversation about holiday engagements and the challenges of family gatherings during the holidays. And Maansi, naturally, shares “tis the damn season,” prompting a conversation about how we really feel about the holiday season and whether they “linger like bad perfume” for us. Are Taylor Swift holidays actually happy holidays? Listen and find out!    Mentioned in the episode:  “Under the Tuscan Sun”  “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days”  “Book Lovers,” Emily Henry  “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” JK Rowling “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” film “Inside Out” *** Episode Highlights:  [02:28] How do we define the holiday season? [06:56] New Years Day:I’ll be picking up bottles with you  [23:24] champagne problems: Your mom's ring in your pocket [37:49] tis the damn season: We could call it even   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E14: Deep Dive - Getaway Car
06-12-2023
E14: Deep Dive - Getaway Car
“It was the best of times, the worst of crimes.” In this episode, we do a deep dive into “Getaway Car” to explore why this particular metaphor is so powerful. We first explore the historical context by discussing the true story of Bonnie and Clyde, and then we dive into the lyrics to discuss the themes of agency, deception, and the shifting dynamics of relationships. Come along for the ride as we figure out what Don Draper has to do with this song, the layered meaning of “poisoning the well,” and why this song is cemented as one of the greats.    Mentioned in this episode: FBI webpage on Bonnie and Clyde "Bonnie and Clyde" "Mad Men" "A Tale of Two Cities," Charles Dickens "Ocean's 11" "Thelma and Louise"   *** Episode Highlights:  [01:15] How to analyze metaphors  [03:00] The original getaway car [5:55] We were jetset. The real-life Bonnie & Clyde [12:43] We're driving in a...Getting into “Getaway Car”  [17:05] He poisoned the well  [22:05] The continuity of reputation  [29:04] Left you at the motel bar. Interpreting the bridge   [38:17] The purpose of “Getaway Car”    Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E13: Show and Tell - Metaphors
29-11-2023
E13: Show and Tell - Metaphors
"Some things you just can’t speak about." Taylor Swift’s superpower is being able to convey very specific emotions to millions who may or may not have ever experienced those emotions before. The way she uses metaphors is one of the ways she makes these songs universally relatable. But not only does she use metaphors in her lyrics, sometimes the songs are metaphors. In this show & tell episode, we each bring a song in which the whole song seems to be a metaphor for something else. Tune in to hear us discuss “Clean,” “Getaway Car,” and “epiphany,” and join us as we try to “make some sense” of the language Taylor uses to so effectively communicate some very powerful emotions.    Mentioned in the episode:  Oxford languages definition of “metaphor”Tale of Two Cities, Charles DickensBonnie and Clyde, 1967Thelma & Louise, 1991The Highwaymen, 2019 *** Episode Highlights:  [00:25] Songs that are metaphors [01:18] “Clean,” - Gone was any trace of you [14:13] “Getaway Car,”  - Nothing good starts in a getaway car [23:55] “epiphany,” - Somethings you just can’t speak about [40:18] What do these metaphors have in common?   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E12: Deep Dive - the last great american dynasty
22-11-2023
E12: Deep Dive - the last great american dynasty
"I had a marvelous time..." Take a step back in time with us as we deep dive into “The Last Great American Dynasty,” from folklore. Our hosts expand on what we learned in our Marxist Criticism episode to take an even closer look at Rebekah Harkness, who she was, and why Taylor Swift wrote a song about her. What do Taylor and Rebekah Harkness have in common, besides owning the same home?Is Rebekah Harkness really “middle class”? How does Taylor build empathy for someone called “mad” and “shameless”? We had a marvelous time diving into this one!  Mentioned in the episode:  “Blue Blood,” Craig Unger  “Atlas Shrugged,” Ayn Rand Rebekah Harkness NYT Obituary, June 1982 "Is There a Chic Way To Go?" Blue Bloods NYT Book Review, May 1988 The Humble Beginnings Of an Elegant Mansion, NYT July 1971 “Hamilton”   *** Episode Highlights:  [01:49] Who is Rebekah Harkness? [06:03] How Taylor’s country storytelling roots enrich the story  [10:53] What is an “American Dynasty”? [15:52] Who’s mad, Rebekah or the townspeople? [25:24] Why did Taylor write this song? *** Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E11: Show and Tell - Marxist Theory
15-11-2023
E11: Show and Tell - Marxist Theory
What does a 19th century philosopher and economist have to do with Taylor Swift? In this week’s episode we put on our Marxist Theory glasses to consider how the ideas of ownership, value, and class differences help us understand Taylor’s music in a whole new way. Maansi teaches us what it means to belong to someone in “Mine.” Jenn digs into the political metaphors in “Miss Americana and the Heartbreak Prince.” And Jodi teaches us about social class differences with the incredible true story behind “the last great american dynasty.” Tune in to learn all of this and see how much fun it can be to play with new literary lenses (even if you don’t necessarily agree with the underlying philosophy).    Mentioned in the episode:  “Mine," Speak Now  “Miss Americana and the Heartbreak Prince," Lover  “the last great american dynasty," folklore  Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner by Katrine Marçal “Politics of Love and Love of Politics: Towards a Marxist Theory of Love” by Raju Das 1984 by George Orwell Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury Bluebood by Carl Unger (Rebekah Harkness biography)  Les Miserables by Victor Hugo Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens ***   Episode Highlights:  [00:25] Introduction to Marxist Theory [04:07] “Mine” from Speak Now [23:05] “Miss Americana and the Heartbreak Prince” from Lover [38:57] “the last great american dynasty” from folklore   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E10: Deep Dive - Red
08-11-2023
E10: Deep Dive - Red
Loving him was like…what? You may know all the words to this old favorite song, but do you know what they mean? In today’s deep dive, we’re unpacking “Red” from Red (Taylor’s Version). After our previous episode on Fall where we talked about why this is an autumn-coded song, our hosts spend more time trying to understand the many (many) metaphors (or is it similes? Analogies?) Taylor Swift uses to describe this relationship. We’ll get a High School English lesson, references to some Millennial-favorite TV shows, and a chance to explore Red as an analogy for Taylor’s transition from country to pop. And then we realize…there’s no right answer!   Mentioned in the episode:  “Red,” Red (Taylor’s Version)  “Shortcut: How Analogies Reveal Connections, Spark Innovation, and Sell Our Greatest Ideas”, John Pollack Aesop’s Fables “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” “august,” folklore “Bridgerton” E2: Deep Dive - Enchanted E6 - Deep Dive - It’s Time to Go  “Picture to Burn,” Taylor Swift “The Hills: New Beginnings” “Complicated,” Avril Levigne    *** Episode Highlights:  [00:20] Introducing today’s deep dive song, “Red”  [01:42] 1st person, 2nd person…whose experience is this? [04:38] How Taylor uses metaphors to make things universal [08:07] Similes, Metaphors, Analogies, oh my! [11:50] Are these tangible, universal metaphors? [16:59] Red as a metaphor for Taylor’s career [20:06] Our favorite part of any Swift song: the bridge! [26:40] Do we actually understand this song?   *** Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree → linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts   This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E9: Show and Tell - Fall Songs
01-11-2023
E9: Show and Tell - Fall Songs
It’s fall, y’all! From chai cookies to a whole new color palette, we have officially entered into the season of fall, and we want to celebrate it with some of our favorite Taylor songs! Join us as Jenn talks about why “You Belong With Me” is forever a fall song in her midwestern mind; Jodi gives us an overview of the fall-themed marketing that came with the release of Red; and Maansi shocks us all by proving that “Cornelia Street” is 100% a Fall song even though it’s on a summer album. Make sure to listen all the way to the end to get a glimpse into a heated topic of debate among your professors as well ;)    Mentioned in this episode:  Shortcut: How Analogies Reveal Connections, Spark Innovation, and Sell Our Greatest Ideas Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte Taylor Swift Style, @taylorswiftstyled, Sarah Kucharski  @taylorswiftinstapostss for cataloging Taylor’s old Instagrams “Basic Autumn Lovers Rise” TikTok, Tumblr re-enactment, Oct 2021, Taylor Swift The Curious Symbolism of Autumn in Literature and Myth, Interesting LIterature.com    *** Episode Highlights:  [00:32] Intro to Fall topic [01:00] “You Belong With Me,” Fearless (Taylor’s Version) 2021 [09:43] “Red,” Red (Taylor’s Version) 2021 [22:51] “Cornelia Street,” Lover 2019   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E8: Deep Dive - the lakes
25-10-2023
E8: Deep Dive - the lakes
"Take me on vacation, take me to anywhere, take me to the lakes!" After our Show & Tell on Ecocriticism, we’re ready to Deep Dive head-first into “the lakes,” bonus track 17 on “folklore (deluxe version).” Join us as we walk through Taylor Swift’s nature imagery and consider the lyrics in some historical context. We'll also unpack the speaker’s relationship with nature as we consider what the speaker is escaping from, where she is going, and why she is running away. And, we introduce a word of the day (“P-A-L-I-M-P-S-E-S-T”) and pull in references from the dictionary, textbooks, classic novels, and poetry for this one, with hopes of understanding the “waves of hurt” that are packed into this song. Mentioned in the episode:  Palimpsest: something having usually diverse layers or aspects apparent beneath the surface Town & Country - Emily Doherty 2023 Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf Victorian Flower Symbolism Lady Chatterley's Lover, DH Lawrence Douglass Livingstone “symbiosis or death” The Spell of the Sensuous, by David Abram   *** Episode Highlights:  [01:16] A quick recap of ecocriticism [03:29] Palimpsest: Heart-stopping waves of hurt [06:56] The cause of grief: Some name-dropping sleaze [10:32] Why does she want to escape: Hunters with cell phones [12:14] Seeking refuge: Not without my muse [16:59] The speaker and nature: I don’t belong [21:49] Nod to Romantics: Is it romantic? [26:17] Final thoughts: What do we think this song is about?   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.
E7: Show and Tell - Ecocriticism
18-10-2023
E7: Show and Tell - Ecocriticism
“But the monsters turned out to be just trees.” Are trees good? Are trees bad? Why the tree imagery? In this episode of AP Taylor Swift, your hosts dive into the world of ecocriticism to explore and analyze how Taylor uses nature in her lyrics to create powerful metaphors that resonate with her listeners. Join us as Jodi discusses the dichotomy of the domestic vs the wild in “Out of the Woods,” Jenn shares some surprising history about William Wordsworth that may change the way you listen to “the lakes” forever, and Maansi teaches us about the sublime with “Snow on the Beach.”  *** Mentioned in the episode:  Recollections of the Lakes and the Lake Poets Dorothy Wordsworth poetry  William Wordsworth poetry Wordsworth & Coleridge Lyrical Ballads Walden: A Fully Annotated Edition  Walt Whitman: The Complete Poems Little Women by Louisa May Alcott Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut “Out of the Woods” “the lakes”  “Snow on the Beach”    *** Episode Highlights:  [0:27] Introduction to ecocriticism [3:06] “Out of the Woods”  [21:06] “the lakes” [38:22] “Snow on the Beach”   Subscribe to get new episode updates: aptaylorswift.substack.com/subscribe   Follow us on social!  TikTok → tiktok.com/@APTaylorSwiftInstagram → instagram.com/APTaylorSwiftYouTube → youtube.com/@APTaylorSwiftLink Tree →linktr.ee/aptaylorswiftBookshop.org → bookshop.org/shop/apts This podcast is neither related to nor endorsed by Taylor Swift, her companies, or record labels. All opinions are our own. Intro music produced by Scott Zadig aka Scotty Z.