The Science of Happiness

PRX and Greater Good Science Center

Learn research-tested strategies for a happier, more meaningful life, drawing on the science of compassion, gratitude, mindfulness, and awe. Hosted by award-winning psychologist Dacher Keltner. Co-produced by PRX and UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

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Episodios

Encore: How to Feel Less Pressed for Time
Hace una semana
Encore: How to Feel Less Pressed for Time
When we devote a little time to the other people in our life, we actually feel like we have more of it. Our guest tried a practice to regain control of his time and schedule Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/mr3r6jfn Episode summary: Like many of us, our guest Bryant Terry felt like he never had enough time in his day. And while he was eager to reconnect with his family, his schedule was spiraling out of control. For our show, Bryant tried a practice proven to help you feel like you have more time, by specifically devoting some of your time to others. He set intentions to spend quality time with his children doing activities that they truly enjoy. By prioritizing those special moments with his family, Bryant felt more control over his schedule, recognizing that he has the power to make time for what truly matters to him. Later, we hear from professor Cassie Mogilner Holmes about why this practice works, and how being intentional with our time can reshape our relationship with it.  Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/gift_of_time Practice Think of a person whom you care about. What might you be able to do for this person that entails nothing more than the giving of your time? Plan a gift of time for this person and give it, whether it means doing something with them (in person or virtually). Spend as much time as needed to do the favor well and do not take any shortcuts. You might even consider taking off your watch or putting your smartphone away.  Today’s guests: Bryant Terry is an award winning chef, author and artist.  Learn about Bryant’s work: http://tinyurl.com/3wf3264h Follow Bryant on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/2w68z8bc Learn about his imprint, 4 Color Books: http://tinyurl.com/yuhrsrp8 Cassie Mogilner Holmes is a professor of marketing and behavioral decision making at UCLA.  Learn about Cassie’s work: http://tinyurl.com/rb5r97s5 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/p6ykm7y2 Ten Ways to Make Your Time Matter: http://tinyurl.com/34dvwnv4 Why You Never Seem to Have Enough Time: http://tinyurl.com/4t8vyhy3 Can Awe Buy You More Time and Happiness? http://tinyurl.com/m28d8wcx How to Spend Your Time on What Matters Most: http://tinyurl.com/ycw527tj More Resources on spending quality time with others: BBC - How to feel more in control of your time: http://tinyurl.com/nhbt7btm Stanford - Jennifer Aaker: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/n8cc6yfk Harvard -You’ll Feel Less Rushed If You Give Time Away:  http://tinyurl.com/yc86ymve How do you devote time to others? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yjdesnze
Happiness Break: Wrap Yourself in Kindness, With Jack Kornfield
08-02-2024
Happiness Break: Wrap Yourself in Kindness, With Jack Kornfield
When we treat ourselves with kindness and gratitude, research shows we feel more motivated and less self-critical. Meditation teacher Jack Kornfield leads in a practice where we gently turn inward. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yfbz28h2 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. Focus on taking deep breaths, relaxing your body.As you recognize the different sensations in your body, consciously envelope yourself in kindness. Thank your body for providing and caring for you.Redirect your loving kindness towards your heart and the varied emotions it carries.Thank your heart for all it does for you. Then, focus your kindness towards your mind and all the thoughts and worries it holds. Thank it for all that it does.Next, turn towards your consciousness as a whole – your emotions, body, thoughts. Rest in a state of comfortable, loving-kindness.When you’re ready, gently open your eyes and reconnect with the world around you. Today’s Happiness Break host: Jack Kornfield is a meditation teacher and author who is one of the leading voices to share Buddhist teachings with a Western audiences. Learn more about Jack’s work: http://tinyurl.com/2wfth7v2 Follow Jack on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/3zs2bjvx Follow Jack on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/bd5r9k4a Follow Jack on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/mryr839y More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Take Our Self-Compassion Quiz: https://tinyurl.com/yysrf663 How to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: https://tinyurl.com/45zkrkam The Five Myths of Self-Compassion: https://tinyurl.com/2p88vass How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain: http://tinyurl.com/2f78cywf Is Gratitude Good for Your Health? http://tinyurl.com/yc86ve9d We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of gratitude and self-compassion. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We’re living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That’s where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
What To Do When You Don’t Like The Way You Feel
01-02-2024
What To Do When You Don’t Like The Way You Feel
Our guest tried a practice in Radical Acceptance, a Buddhist principle made popular by today's expert, psychologist Tara Brach.  Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/362m4n3b Episode summary: Sometimes, a setback in work or life can leave us feeling defeated and uninspired. Nadia Zafar is a neurobiology student who has been pursuing her PhD for the last 6 years. Recently, her lack of progress had her spiraling in thoughts of self-doubt and unworthiness. For our show, Nadia tried a practice rooted in radical acceptance, called RAIN. By actively recognizing emotions without judgment, investigating them further, and then nurturing those sensations, she started to approach her negative and anxious thoughts from a place of self-compassion instead of blame. Later, we speak with the creator of the RAIN practice, Tara Brach. She explains the elements of the practice that make it so effective, how approaching situations from a place of acceptance helps disrupt our reactive instincts — opening up more space for awareness and compassion for ourselves and others. Practice: When you come up against something challenging – you’re angry or frustrated or feeling any way about yourself, another person, or a situation – move through these steps. It might be helpful to sit somewhere you feel comfortable. Close your eyes for a few moments, and begin by taking a few deep, intentional breaths, to help settle the mind. Recognize what’s happening. For example, “I am getting caught up in anger right now.”Allow the emotion you recognize to be there: Accept that you are feeling the way you’re feeling. You may go a step further and forgive yourself for it, for example by saying to yourself, “Anger forgiven.”Investigate what’s underneath whatever you’re feeling by directing a gentle curiosity towards it. For example, where there is anger, there is something we care deeply about.Nurture: You might put your hand on your heart, remind yourself that many have struggled with the very thing you’re struggling with now, and send yourself a message of kindness and understanding. Today’s guests: Nadia Zafar is a 6th year neurobiology PhD student at the University of Toronto. Tara Brach is a leading voice in the field of contemplative meditation practices. Learn more about Tara and her work: https://www.tarabrach.com/ Read Tara’s book, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha:  http://tinyurl.com/4csarvmf Follow Tara on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/3arhy4uh Follow Tara on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/2drpvp6c Follow Tara on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/y743bkru Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/msf5ccde Can Self-Awareness Help You Be More Empathic? http://tinyurl.com/5yh8z2s2 How Does Mindfulness Help Cultivate Self-Compassion? http://tinyurl.com/yuhwmja4 How to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: http://tinyurl.com/2a3mm6pf Want to Change Your Life? Try Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/2y2ryc6m More Resources on Radical Acceptance: Harvard - Greater self-acceptance improves emotional well-being: http://tinyurl.com/2ty58cbh BBC - Why self-compassion – not self-esteem – leads to success: http://tinyurl.com/yj2zax8x Ted - Dare to rewire your brain for self-compassion: http://tinyurl.com/yc2ru73p Tell us about your experiences and struggles with accepting difficult situations. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/v6j42zu7
Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach
25-01-2024
Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach
A meditation in meeting our most difficult emotions — like anger, disappointment, or fear — with mindfulness and gentle care. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/48jas955 How to Do This Practice: When you come up against something challenging – you’re angry or frustrated or feeling any way about yourself, another person, or a situation, move through these steps. It might be helpful to sit somewhere you feel comfortable closing your eyes for a few moments, and begin by taking a few deep, intentional breaths, to help settle the mind. Recognize what’s happening. For example, “I am getting caught up in anger right now.”Allow the emotion you recognize to be there: Accept that you are feeling the way you’re feeling. You may go a step further and forgive yourself for it, for example by saying to yourself, “Anger forgiven.”Investigate what’s underneath whatever you’re feeling by directing a gentle curiosity towards it. For example, where there is anger, there is something we care deeply about.Nurture: Send yourself a message of kindness. You might put your hand on your heart, for example, and remind yourself that everyone experiences reactivity, and send yourself a message of kindness and understanding. Today’s Happiness Break host: Tara Brach is a psychologist and leading voice in contemporary meditative practices and the author of numerous popular books on contemplative practice. Read Tara’s seminal book, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of the Buddha: http://tinyurl.com/4csarvmf Learn more about Tara’s work: https://www.tarabrach.com/ Find classes taught by Dr. Neff: https://www.tarabrach.com/online-courses/ Follow Tara on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tarabrach/ Follow Tara on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tarabrach More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Go Through Life with Love in Your Heart, A Q&A with Tara Brach: http://tinyurl.com/2ne65wed The Mindfulness Skill That Is Crucial for Stress: http://tinyurl.com/3xmnekw2 How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination: http://tinyurl.com/yc7phxsc Want to Change Your Life? Try Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/2y2ryc6m Overcoming Objections to Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/yc2wvusr Self-Compassion Could Help You Be More Tolerant of Others: http://tinyurl.com/3kwrm88h We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with the Light RAIN practice. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How (And Why) To Find More Beauty in the Everyday
18-01-2024
How (And Why) To Find More Beauty in the Everyday
What happens when we intentionally look for beautiful things in our day-to-day lives? We explore a lab-tested practice shown to help you feel happier. Link to Transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yretvrkp Episode summary: When was the last time you witnessed a beautiful moment? Maybe it was a striking sunset, a kind exchange between strangers, or a hearty laugh between two friends. Beautiful moments surround us, and research suggests that taking the time to admire them can actually benefit our health and happiness. For our show, restorative justice advocate Darnell Washington looked for 9 beautiful things each day and reflected on them. In doing so, he recognized how admiring different types of beauty from nature to the goodness of others, can have a powerful impact on his own humanity. Later, we hear from the psychologist who created the practice, René T. Proyer, about how making it a point to notice different kinds of beauty benefits our happiness and reduces depression. Practice: Every night for at least one week, set about 15 minutes before going to bed to think about nine beautiful things that happened during the day, 3 each in the following categories.Write down three beautiful things in human behavior (morally, positively valued behavior, ie good deeds).Write down three things you experienced as beautiful in nature and/or the environment.Write down three beautiful things in general that you noticed during the day  (referring to aesthetics, like art, music, architecture, etc).Note why you found each of these nine things beautiful. Today’s guests: Darnell Washington is a formerly incarcerated restorative justice advocate from California. Listen to Darnell’s Ted Talk: http://tinyurl.com/cujz79fk René T. Proyer is a professor and researcher at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Learn about René’s work: http://tinyurl.com/4sa9vye9 Follow René on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/3x5986u6 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Finding Beauty in the Everyday (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/2w2ht55h Why Seeing Beauty Matters, Even in the Midst of War: http://tinyurl.com/4zy436xk How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative: http://tinyurl.com/d2vzpsaj Finding Awe in the Ordinary: http://tinyurl.com/aavr2pkv More Resources on Appreciating Beauty: BBC - The neuroscience of beauty: What your brain finds beautiful – and how this shapes your thoughts: http://tinyurl.com/47s6zcre TED - Nature. Beauty. Gratitude: http://tinyurl.com/upnrzthc CNN - It’s the little things: Why animals, sunsets and coffee make us happy: http://tinyurl.com/yckephaf We want to hear from you! What beautiful moment have you noticed recently? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rete us and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yfsx9zwp
Happiness Break: A Meditation to Find Grounding in the New Year, With Spring Washam
11-01-2024
Happiness Break: A Meditation to Find Grounding in the New Year, With Spring Washam
Research shows feeling connected with nature can lower our stress response. This visualization meditation can help you feel at ease, no matter where you are. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/2k6pdh7n How to Do This Practice: It is encouraged to try this practice outdoors Begin the practice by focusing on your breath, and relaxing your body, noticing how it feels supported, particularly by the earth.Allow yourself to let go of anything you are mentally or emotionally carrying, visualizing it going into the earth, letting the ground continue to support you.Draw on imagery from nature to cultivate feelings of strength and sturdiness to support you. For example, imagine that your own body is rooting into the earth to become as unshakable as a tree,   imagine that you are as steady as a mountain, your breath is the breeze and your mind is as open and boundless as the sky.End the practice by placing your hand on your heart, offering yourself kindness, well-being and joy. Today’s Happiness Break host: Spring Washam is an author and meditation teacher based in Oakland, California. Learn more about Spring’s work: http://tinyurl.com/3bbshnn7 Read Spring’s books here: http://tinyurl.com/4hkft4js More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: What To Do When You’re Struggling, With Spring Washam: http://tinyurl.com/mrx8t9st What Happens When We Reconnect With Nature: http://tinyurl.com/553xwm47 Why Is Nature So Good for Your Mental Health? http://tinyurl.com/ycx9ns4p How Nature Helps Us Heal: http://tinyurl.com/2p93682j Why You Need More Nature in Your Life: http://tinyurl.com/28z27wb2 We love hearing from you! How do you connect with nature? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How to Stick to Your Resolutions in 2024
04-01-2024
How to Stick to Your Resolutions in 2024
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits We explore how the science of behavior change can help us form new habits and be happier while doing it.Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/4e294mdt Episode summary: Many of us are heading into the new year with a resolution we want to live by — a new good habit we’d like to form. But actually sticking to those good habits isn’t always easy — one failure can have us losing the motivation to continue. For our show, we spoke with Cholpon Ramizova and Derick Gnonlonfoun, a couple who set out to create better food habits by cooking at home more and incorporating more vegetables into their meals. As they started to develop this new habit, the two realized that a mindful and kind attitude towards themselves was a key element to their success. Later, we hear from psychologists Katy Milkman and Kristin Neff, to learn about how failure can actually be beneficial when pursuing a goal, and how to cope with it. Today’s guests: Cholpon Ramizova and Derick Gnonlonfoun are a couple living in London. Check out Derick’s artwork here: http://tinyurl.com/2kc9h478 Katy Milkman is a professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the Co-Director of The Behavior Change for Good Initiative. Learn more about Katy and her work: http://tinyurl.com/4ypvmvhf Find more information on the Behavior Change for Good Initiative: http://tinyurl.com/mr94wh6f Follow Katy on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/mr25etdp Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Make New Year’s Resolutions That Feel Good: http://tinyurl.com/3bvs8zb5 Make Self-Compassion One of Your New Year’s Resolutions: http://tinyurl.com/yc2t42nt Tips for Keeping New Year’s Resolutions: http://tinyurl.com/y2pt9uz2 How to Learn From Your Failures: http://tinyurl.com/5h7uybux More Resources on Forming Good Habits: BBC - 4 simple, science-backed ways to build habits that stick: http://tinyurl.com/2p8dk6wt Harvard -What Does It Really Take to Build a New Habit?  http://tinyurl.com/ndrfybyb Stanford - Building Habits: The Key to Lasting Behavior Change: http://tinyurl.com/4utw95sj TED - The 1-minute secret to forming a new habit: http://tinyurl.com/mum8kzvj Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/2pxdw8vr
Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner
28-12-2023
Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner
When we imagine our best possible selves in our relationships, we feel more motivated to achieve our goals and a greater sense of control over our lives. This week, Dacher leads a visualization exercise in preparation for the new year. Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yj43srye How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to begin the practice. Take deep breaths.Focus on the person you are in a romantic relationship with, or a dear friend. Bring an image of them to mind, like how they look and their mannerisms.Imagine your life in the future, and how you would like to be the best version of yourself in your relationship with them. Picture yourself interacting with them — what is happening? What are you doing and saying? What is the tone of the interaction?Repeat this exercise by focusing on friendships and familial relationships. Take note of any common actions across all relationships that you would like to take. Set an intention about how you will interact within your relationships in the new year.When you’re done, reground yourself in the present moment, focusing on the sensations in your body.  Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the UC, Berkeley. Check out Dacher’s most recent book, Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life: https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Find Your Best Possible Self (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/265b34pj How Thinking About the Future Makes Life More Meaningful: https://tinyurl.com/24mex4by 10 Pillars of a Strong Relationship:https://tinyurl.com/3zffc8x4 For the New Year, Try Imagining Your Best Possible Life: https://tinyurl.com/4carr6kv We love hearing from you! How do you plan to be your best possible self in the new year? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How Thinking About Your Ancestors Can Help You Thrive
21-12-2023
How Thinking About Your Ancestors Can Help You Thrive
Join our limited newsletter, The Science of Habits, to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Year's resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits We explore how contemplating our heritage can make us feel more belonging, gratitude, and confidence in what we're capable of achieving. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/5djerhbj Episode summary: Oral historian Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz knows the profound impact the past can have on the present. For our show, Mi’Jan tried a lab-tested writing practice that took the historical facts she knew about her own family further – by way of her imagination. She journaled about her great-great grandmother Emma, the last enslaved person in her family, and her late father, Njoroge , imagining what they might say to her today.We also hear from psychologist  Susan Moore about how learning about your ancestors can help you feel a sense of self-knowledge, gratitude and belonging. Practice: Imagine an ancestor in your family lineage. It can be someone you have known or someone from centuries ago.Spend the next 5-15 minutes writing about them. If you don’t know the details, imagine how their life would have been. Write down anything that comes to mind such as their way of life, their profession or what they looked like.Next imagine what they would tell you if they were alive today. What specific insights, advice or feedback would they give you? Write down your reflections. Today’s guests: Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz is an artist, documentarian and oral historian. Learn more about Mi’Jan Celie Tho-Biaz’s work: http://tinyurl.com/5e8t9ha7 Follow Mi’Jan on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/mr3yp3kz Susan Moore is a psychology professor at the Swinburne University of Technology. Follow Susan on Twitter:http://tinyurl.com/mr3vsr2k Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Teens Today Are Different from Past Generations: http://tinyurl.com/y5ffwavr Don’t Be So Quick to Stereotype Generations: http://tinyurl.com/mrxx7xfj How Collective Trauma Can Hurt the Next Generation: http://tinyurl.com/2vunsm2z Find Purpose by Connecting Across Generations: http://tinyurl.com/h4yyjesh More Resources on Connecting with Ancestors: NPR- 8 listeners share the powerful ways they keep in touch with their ancestors: http://tinyurl.com/48kjmenk Harvard - How Family History Can Inspire Accountable Reparations and Foster Ancestral Healing: http://tinyurl.com/ta24x773 TED - How to be a good ancestor: http://tinyurl.com/54zvkzsv How do you connect with your family history? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yv69erdh
Happiness Break: A Meditation for Seeking Forgiveness, With Shelly Tygielski
14-12-2023
Happiness Break: A Meditation for Seeking Forgiveness, With Shelly Tygielski
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits When we practice forgiveness, studies show we can have healthier relationships, higher self-esteem, and less anxiety and depression. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/mt9uwad8 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to begin the practice. Soften your gaze and take a few slow, deep breaths.Imagine there is a light made of compassion, love and understanding all around you.As the light comforts you, think of a person you would like to seek forgiveness from. Take note of any emotions that arise. Imagine sincerely apologizing to them.Visualize a bridge connecting you and the individual. Know that while forgiveness is not always immediately accepted, you've taken the first step towards healing.Turn your forgiveness towards yourself, breathing in love and compassion.End this practice by reconnecting with your body and refocusing your gaze, remembering that the journey of forgiveness is ongoing. .Today’s Happiness Break host: Shelly Tygielski is a trauma-informed mindfulness teacher based in Florida. To get Shelly Tygielski and Justin Michael Williams’ book How We Ended Racism: go to howweendedracism.com or your favorite book seller. Learn more about Shelly’s work: https://tinyurl.com/26xkdnku Follow Shelly on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/4k4bx3nn Follow Shelly on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/bdfsb9pt Follow Shelly on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/2edu2fzu More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Eight Keys to Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/2s4hbz3a The New Science of Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/5f2c7sfb How to Overcome Barriers to Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/22zteuyj The Power of Forgiveness at Work: https://tinyurl.com/mrx5hzvh How to Build a More Forgiving Community: https://tinyurl.com/5frja2h2 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with forgiveness. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
When It's Hard To Connect, Try Being Curious
07-12-2023
When It's Hard To Connect, Try Being Curious
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits When we're more curious, we are more likely to be happier and have stronger relationships. Try deepening your curiosity with these science-backed practices from author Scott Shigeoka. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/276u4yxu Episode summary: As a cardiologist and immigrant in the United States, Stephanie Hsiao has always placed an emphasis on advancing her skills in order to succeed. So when she received the diagnosis that her son was neurodiverse, Stephanie went immediately into action mode to help her son — but she felt like she was missing something. For our show, Stephanie tried a practice to cultivate “deep curiosity,” and found that a curious outlook helped her to check her assumptions about parenting and discover her son’s strengths and interests. Later, we hear from curiosity expert Scott Shigeoka about the difference between shallow and deep curiosity, and how it can help us forge stronger connections with others. Practice: Before engaging in curiosity: Slow down, focus on your breathing. Set an intention to focus on curiosity and maybe visualize yourself being curious.While in conversation: Be open to being wrong, continuously check your assumptions, and actively turn towards those who are seeking your attention.Going forward: Make commitments to yourself and with others to engage in difficult, but open-minded interactions. Today’s guests: Stephanie Hsiao is a mother and cardiologist based in San Francisco, California. Scott Shigeoka is an author and storyteller who focuses on themes of curiosity and well-being. Order Scott Shigeoka’s book Seek: How Curiosity can Transform Your Life and Save the World: https://tinyurl.com/4jrxbupj Learn More About Scott’s work: https://tinyurl.com/y5xyxky7 Follow Scott on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/3acu6jhm Follow Scott on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/3m3k3bm9 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Six Surprising Benefits of Curiosity: https://tinyurl.com/7kcr32su How to Stay Open and Curious in Hard Conversations: https://tinyurl.com/y2f2e9ce Why Curious People Have Better Relationships: https://tinyurl.com/2xw5y9yr Does Curiosity Have a Dark Side? https://tinyurl.com/5n88wzyd How Curiosity Can Help Us Overcome Disconnection: https://tinyurl.com/9kaas6nz More Resources on Curiosity: BBC - Curiosity: The neglected trait that drives success: https://tinyurl.com/38bubaak Harvard - A Curious Mind: https://tinyurl.com/324hyzv4 TED - How Curiosity Will Save Us: https://tinyurl.com/muswe2y5 Tell us about your experience with being curious. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/m6aezjce This episode was supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, as part of our project on "Expanding Awareness of the Science of Intellectual Humility." To learn more, go to https://tinyurl.com/2dj6hw29
Happiness Break: A Visualization to Connect With Your Heritage, With Bryant Terry
30-11-2023
Happiness Break: A Visualization to Connect With Your Heritage, With Bryant Terry
Chef and author Bryant Terry leads us through a visualization to connect with our ancestors by appreciating our families' traditional foods. Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Year’s resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/yc6d69py How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to start this practice, focusing on your breath.Think of a meal or dish that is linked to your culture. Reflect on what it looks and tastes like, as well as when you would eat this dish.Recall whoever would normally make this dish for you, and any stories that might have told you about it.Refocusing your attention on the dish, consider all the different ingredients that went into it, tracing them back to where they came from.Reflect on how generations of your family have been nourished from these sources, all leading up to you.Complete the practice by grounding yourself in your body, and thanking your ancestors for what they have provided. Today’s Happiness Break host: Bryant Terry is a meditator, chef and food justice activist based in San Francisco. Learn about Bryant Terry: https://tinyurl.com/juvz7sb2 Read Bryant’s books: https://tinyurl.com/59nxrn8e Follow Bryant on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/ycyb8dwc More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: A Meditation to Connect to Your Roots, with Yuria Celidwen (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/3mrd6247 Episode 81: Are You Listening to Your Elders? (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/2wjbjj3e Do Rituals Help Us to Savor Food? https://tinyurl.com/52xpj7fn Find Purpose by Connecting Across Generations: https://tinyurl.com/h4yyjesh We love hearing from you! Tell us about your favorite cultural dish. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Being Kind is Good for Your Health
23-11-2023
Being Kind is Good for Your Health
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Year’s resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/255mcn3b Episode summary: This week, we’re focusing on doing good for others, and we’ve turned to someone who cheers people up for a living. Dana Merwin is a professional clown and performer based in San Francisco. For our show, she tried a practice where she performed three acts of kindness a day for the people in her life. She reflects on how simple, kind gestures can pave the way for deep and valuable connections, and that being kind to others ultimately makes us feel good as well. We also hear from psychologist David Cregg about how doing good things for others improves our sense of social connection, purpose in life, and can even help us live longer and healthier lives. Practice: Write down or think about three acts of kindness you could perform the next day.Do three kind acts for people in your life.At the end of the day, reflect on how these experiences make you feel. Today’s guests: Dana Merwin is a progressional clown and performer based in San Francisco. Learn about Dana’s Work: https://tinyurl.com/bd6ew95a Follow Dana on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/dspstzrk David Cregg is a clinical psychologist at South Texas Veterans Health Care System whose research specializes in positive psychology. Follow David on Google Scholar: https://tinyurl.com/ajay6n6a Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Do You Underestimate the Impact of Being Kind? https://tinyurl.com/583hwar9 Just One Thing: Be Kind to Yourself by Being Kind to Others: https://tinyurl.com/4dsf7bn2 Do We Have an Instinctive Urge to Be Kind? https://tinyurl.com/y5fabnj3 Can Helping Others Help You Find Meaning in Life? https://tinyurl.com/yc4zhw9w Three Strategies for Bringing More Kindness into Your Life: https://tinyurl.com/22cx7w9f More Resources on Doing Good Things For Others: BBC - What we do and don't know about kindness: https://tinyurl.com/na6jvr9e Harvard: Lending a helping hand: https://tinyurl.com/yckf4759 UCL: 10 benefits of helping others: https://tinyurl.com/4wn5syhh Mayo Health Clinic: The art of kindness: https://tinyurl.com/5ah5dahc What kind action have you done for others recently? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/873v67ah
Happiness Break: Feel more Gratitude, With Eve Ekman
16-11-2023
Happiness Break: Feel more Gratitude, With Eve Ekman
Renew your sense of gratitude by remembering acts of kindness, with social scientist and meditation teacher Eve Ekman. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/kjkzpdk8 How to Do This Practice: Begin the practice by focusing on your breath and settling your mind and body. Notice any physical sensations that arise.Shift your attention away from your body, recalling a time in the last week where you received kindness. Think about the details of the event, and notice how you react to this kindness.Next, focus on a recent experience where you extended kindness. As you relive this event in your mind, allow yourself to be filled with the feeling of kindness.Reconnect with the physical sensations in your body, acknowledging that it is full of gratitude. Today’s Happiness Break host: Eve Ekman is a contemplative social scientist and meditation teacher from San Francisco, California. Learn more about Eve’s work: https://tinyurl.com/2vhuarh8 Find out about Eve’s Emotional trainings with Cultivating Emotional Balance: https://tinyurl.com/5n95m7yx Explore Eve’s Project, The Atlas of Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/mt75ytm3 Follow Eve on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/3txahape More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain: https://tinyurl.com/2f78cywf Tips for Keeping a Gratitude Journal: https://tinyurl.com/4uyu9pud Why Gratitude Is Good: https://tinyurl.com/5n88p589 How Gratitude Motivates Us to Become Better People: https://tinyurl.com/3jzr7jfm Three Surprising Ways That Gratitude Works at Work: https://tinyurl.com/4f5m9hde We love hearing from you! How do you express gratitude? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Encore: The Science of a Good Night's Sleep
09-11-2023
Encore: The Science of a Good Night's Sleep
This week we revisit our science-backed tips for a good night's sleep with sleep scientist Eti Ben Simon and host of the Sleep with Me podcast Drew Ackerman. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/2p8t47eh Episode summary: A good night’s sleep can be hard to come by, and beating yourself up over not sleeping enough will only make it worse. On this episode of The Science of Happiness, the host of Sleep With Me podcast Drew Ackerman joins us to try science-backed tips for finding your natural sleep rhythm. Drew, also known as “Dearest Scooter,” talks about his history with insomnia and sleep anxiety, sleep hygiene, and his philosophy on bringing more self-compassion into his approach to trying to fall asleep. Then we hear from sleep scientist Eti Ben Simon about how sleep affects your social life. Practice: Avoid alcohol and caffeine after 2 p.m. to unmask your true biological sleep needs.Keep lights dim in the evening and limit access to LED lights after 9 p.m.Go to sleep as soon as you feel tired (even if you're in the middle of something). This will help you figure out the earliest window it is physiologically possible for you to fall asleep.Do not use an alarm clock to wake up. Today’s guests: Drew Ackerman is the host of one of the most listened-to sleep podcasts, Sleep with Me.  Listen to Sleep With Me Podcast: https://pod.link/sleep-with-me Follow Drew on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/2p8nrhnp Follow Drew on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dearestscooter/ Follow Drew on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Sleepwithmepodcast/ Eti Ben Simon is a sleep scientist and postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley, where she works at Matthew Walkers’ Center for Human Sleep Science. Learn more about Eti and her work: https://www.sleepingeti.com/ Follow Eti on Twitter: https://twitter.com/etoosh Follow Eti on Google Scholar: https://tinyurl.com/328aa5yr Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Four Surprising Ways to Get a Better Night’s Sleep: https://tinyurl.com/2p832bh5 How Mindfulness Improves Sleep: https://tinyurl.com/2p8rhkhj Your Sleep Tonight Changes How You React to Stress Tomorrow: https://tinyurl.com/2p8zvbjz More Resources for A Good Night’s Sleep: Matthew Walker’s 11 Tips for Improving Sleep Quality: https://tinyurl.com/2kadu7va TED - Sleeping with Science: https://tinyurl.com/23mmbdy3 Harvard Health - 8 Tips to Get a Good Night’s Sleep: https://tinyurl.com/2p8um9z7 BBC - Why Do We Sleep? https://tinyurl.com/2p8z9v2d Tell us about your experiences and struggles with falling asleep. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus
Happiness Break: Find Calm When You Can't Clear Your Mind, With Lama Rod Owens
02-11-2023
Happiness Break: Find Calm When You Can't Clear Your Mind, With Lama Rod Owens
Take a break from ruminating with Lama Rod Owens as he leads you in a meditation to cultivate a sky-like mind. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/5fn7sw7t How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin this practice.Turn your attention to the rise and fall of your thoughts and feelings within your mind.Imagine that your mind is a vast open sky and that your thoughts are like clouds passing through.Recognize that these thoughts are just experiences that come and go, and that they do not constitute the whole sky or your whole being. Allow yourself to trust the bright openness of your mind, without worrying about it becoming stormy.When you are ready, reground yourself in the present moment by noticing how your body, and how it is held by your seat. Today’s Happiness Break host: Lama Rod Owens is a Buddhist teacher, author and activist passionate about creating engaging and inclusive healing spaces. Learn about Lama Rod Owens’ work: https://tinyurl.com/wd2huac5 Read Lama Rod Owens’ latest book, The New Saints: From Broken Hearts to Spiritual Warriors: https://tinyurl.com/4pj8wb7x Follow Lama Rod Owens on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/527378v9 Follow Lama Rod Owens on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/mwa2vwrh Follow Lama Rod Owens on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/h33pyjye More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Four Ways to Calm Your Mind in Stressful Times: https://tinyurl.com/6apdf52p How to Gain Freedom from Your Thoughts: https://tinyurl.com/hp8s5wv6 How to Focus a Wandering Mind: https://tinyurl.com/y7jhkewv How to Enjoy Being Alone with Your Thoughts: https://tinyurl.com/3ej6acx6 We love hearing from you! Have you tried quieting your mind? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
The Science of Singing Along
26-10-2023
The Science of Singing Along
For time immemorial, humans have connected deeply through singing with one another. We explore the science behind this, plus how group singing benefits other aspects of our health.  Link to Episode Transcript: https://tinyurl.com/bdzkmezu Episode summary: When was the last time you sang with another person? This week, we’re digging into the science of singing — and more specifically, the science of singing with others, with author Casper ter Kuile. Casper started hosting signing groups in his home as a way to feel connected to others and build a community after moving to a new city. He found that singing is a powerful mode of communication that’s entirely different from talking, by letting people have fun together before even learning what the other does for work. We also hear from psychologist Arla Good, about how group singing can act as a tool for social bonding through a mood-boosting oxytocin response. Today’s guests: Casper ter Kuile is an author and speaker who focuses on themes of community building, rituals and spirituality.  Read Casper’s book, The Power of Ritual: https://tinyurl.com/5653xymp Learn about Casper’s latest project, The Nearness: https://tinyurl.com/yc76wjvj Follow Casper on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/muueecw2 Follow Casper on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/mr2jsufk Arla Good is a psychologist at Toronto Metropolitan University whose research specializes in the benefits of group singing on well-being. Learn more about Arla and her work: https://tinyurl.com/3fxwsffs Learn about Arla’s work with the SingWell Project: https://tinyurl.com/4acdhdc6 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Music Helps Us Be More Creative: https://tinyurl.com/4mj6vs44 Four Ways Music Strengthens Social Bonds: https://tinyurl.com/y257y25p How Music Bonds Us Together: https://tinyurl.com/np3z3cn Five Ways Music Can Make You Healthier: https://tinyurl.com/4ckbtc2e Where Music and Empathy Converge in the Brain: https://tinyurl.com/23tehxms More Resources on Group Singing: BBC -The world's most accessible stress reliever: https://tinyurl.com/37atkk78 Washington Post - Singing is good for you. Singing with others may be even better: https://tinyurl.com/mv3a525d Oxford - Choir singing improves health, happiness – and is the perfect icebreaker: https://tinyurl.com/3z78634n Ted - Choral Connections: The Surprising Benefits of Singing Together: https://tinyurl.com/y5yu236z Have you ever sung with a group? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/yzazbec4
A Meditation For Connecting In Polarized Times, With Scott Shigeoka
19-10-2023
A Meditation For Connecting In Polarized Times, With Scott Shigeoka
Having a curious approach to life can improve our mood, creativity and relationships. Scott Shigeoka leads a visualization exercise to help you approach someone you might disagree with with an open and curious mind. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/4dfsxr2x How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to begin the practice, focusing on your breath.Imagine that you are going to interact with a friend during a moment of conflict. Visualize the meeting, like the space around you and how you greet each other.Picture yourself showing a curious and loving perspective. Take note of what you would say, the tone of your voice, your body language, and in particular the types of questions you ask to impact the conversation.Pay attention to how you would feel if your friend was receiving your curiosity well, compared to if they weren’t.Visualize yourself thanking your friend for their friendship and curiosity before leaving the meeting. Today’s Happiness Break host: Scott Shigeoka is an author and storyteller who focuses on themes of curiosity and well-being. Order Scott Shigeoka’s book Seek: How Curiosity can Transform Your Life and Save the World: https://tinyurl.com/4jrxbupj Learn More About Scott’s work: https://tinyurl.com/y5xyxky7 Follow Scott on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/3acu6jhm Follow Scott on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/3m3k3bm9 More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Why Curious People Have Better Relationships: https://tinyurl.com/2xw5y9yr How to Stay Open and Curious in Hard Conversations: https://tinyurl.com/y2f2e9ce Six Surprising Benefits of Curiosity: https://tinyurl.com/7kcr32su How Curiosity Can Help Us Overcome Disconnection: https://tinyurl.com/9kaas6nz What Curiosity Looks Like in the Brain: https://tinyurl.com/22rj6nbh We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of handling a difficult interaction. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How Holding Yourself Can Reduce Stress
12-10-2023
How Holding Yourself Can Reduce Stress
Simple actions like consciously placing a hand on your heart or hugging yourself can lower your cortisol levels, heart rate, and help you feel less stressed. Our guest tries a practice in self-soothing touch. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/2zbykwh6 Episode summary: While reading this, you might be fiddling with your fingers or have a hand resting on your face -– these are examples of self-touch. This week, we are examining the benefits of offering ourselves soothing touches with comedian Calvin Cato. Calvin leads a busy, stressful life. He tried the self-soothing touch practice as a way to better connect with himself. He found that physically caring for himself allowed him to reground his emotions and regulate his stress. To his surprise, the physical sensations also triggered fond childhood memories with his father. Later, we hear from self-compassion and mindfulness expert Aljoscha Dreisoerner about why we evolved to crave touch and how self-touch can be as effective as getting a hug from someone else. Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. What works for one person might not work for another. Here are some options you can choose from: Place one or both hands on your heart or stomach.Placing your right hand on your heart and the left on your belly while focusing on the rising and falling of the breath.Stroke your arms or cheeks.Place your right hand under your left arm, by the side of the heart. Place your left hand on the top of your right arm. Try the practice you choose for at least twenty seconds. While doing the practice, focus on taking a few deep breaths, drawing attention to the pressure and warmth of your hands.Repeat as many times as you would like. Today’s guests: Calvin Cato is a comedian and writer based in New York City. Learn more about Calvin: https://tinyurl.com/3hcmcf8y Read Calvin’s personal essay in Queendom: https://tinyurl.com/42u5h23w Follow Calvin on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/2p5pkmkb Follow Calvin on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/z5h47asz Aljoscha Dreisoerner is a Post Doctorate at The University of Vienna interested in self-compassion and mindfulness. Learn about Aljoscha’s work: https://tinyurl.com/bdfa48n7 Follow Aljoscha on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/94txhhrj Follow Aljoscha on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/yc4wbmfh Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Why Physical Touch Matters for Your Well-Being: https://tinyurl.com/m2ea524m Hands On Research: The Science of Touch: https://tinyurl.com/bdfbk36d Four Ways Hugs Are Good for Your Health: https://tinyurl.com/3x39apr8 How Touch Shapes Emotion: https://tinyurl.com/3ukuut3b More Resources on self soothing touch: CBC - Self-soothing strategies to help break a chain of anxious thoughts quickly: https://tinyurl.com/3ksh2u6e TED - Bonus: Self-soothing exercises with Dr. Kristin Neff: https://tinyurl.com/mvrwa596 Business Insider - It's possible to be literally starved for touch — here are the symptoms of the condition: https://tinyurl.com/bdc42rh7 Have you tried giving yourself a hug recently? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/ytt84cex
5 Minutes of Progressive Muscle Relaxation, With Jo Qina'au
05-10-2023
5 Minutes of Progressive Muscle Relaxation, With Jo Qina'au
When we mindfully tense and then release our muscles, our bodies are telling our brains to relax. Try this practice that's proven to help with depression, anxiety, and stress.  Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/477t6uhv How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable space to complete this practice, ideally lying down.Soften your gaze and turn your attention towards your feet. When inhaling, tense your feet as much as you can for no more than 10 seconds. Then exhale and release your feet and toes, noticing the feelings of relaxation as you untense. Repeat this process of tensing and releasing different parts of your body, working upwards from your legs to your torso, all the way to your upper body, arms and face. Remember to inhale when you are tensing your body, and exhale when you release.  Today’s Happiness Break host: Jo Qina’au is meditation guide and clinical psychology fellow from Harvard University.  Learn more about Jo Qina’au’s work: https://tinyurl.com/bdfyw3ar Follow Jo on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/yc846waw More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Use Your Body to Relax Your Mind (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/mueeubr7 Five Ways Mindfulness Meditation Is Good for Your Health: https://tinyurl.com/3f79nsav Why You Should Take a Relaxing Lunch Break: https://tinyurl.com/2p8axdba Four Ways to Calm Your Mind in Stressful Times: https://tinyurl.com/6apdf52p We love hearing from you! What was your experience like with this progressive muscle relaxation exercise? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.